More Police Needed To Enforce New WOF Scheme

Denis O'Rourke
Author: 
Denis O'Rourke
Date: 
Wednesday, January 30, 2013 - 15:45

New Zealand First says the Government’s change to an annual vehicle warrant of fitness system must be viewed with caution.

Transport spokesperson Denis O’Rourke says a dangerous situation may occur when annual inspections are instigated for vehicles which are three years old and registered on or after 1 January 2001.

“The Government’s claim that extra Police enforcement will be enough to maintain and improve road safety under the new WOF scheme is laughable.

“The number of police was increased when New Zealand First was part of the 2005-2008 coalition Government but that increase has not been maintained by National.

“If the Government is serious about road safety then the first thing it must do is to get more police on the streets so the new system can be properly enforced without impacting negatively on other aspects of policing.”

Mr O’Rourke says mechanics say that even with the current six monthly checks, motorists ask whether essential vehicle safety components will last the distance.

“Hopefully making WOF checks an annual event will not lead to an increase in crashes resulting from defective vehicles. We will only know that once the new law comes into effect next year.

“But if the crash rate does increase then it will put to shame the Government’s policy that information and education programmes will be enough to convince motorists to keep their vehicles up to WOF standard,” says Mr O’Rourke.

Tags: 
Portfolios: